Home General News Rastafarians should set up their own school-NAGRAT president

Rastafarians should set up their own school-NAGRAT president

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The President of the National Association of Graduate Teachers (NAGRAT), Angel Carbonu
The President of the National Association of Graduate Teachers (NAGRAT), Angel Carbonu

The President of the National Association of Graduate Teachers (NAGRAT), Angel Carbonu, has suggested that if Rastafarians want their children to keep their dreadlocks in Senior High Schools (SHS), then they should set up their own schools in Ghana.

Don’t even know why the Rastafarians don’t have their own schools, because they’ve been in this country [Ghana] for a very long time,” Mr Carbonu said.

He was addressing a press conference in Accra on Monday [March 22, 2021]   Following a decision by the Achimota SHS who refused to admit two Rastafarian first year students on campus. At the press conference, Mr. Carbonu uttered that Achimota School did not refuse to admit the students, adding that the school only hinted out the rules and regulations of the school to the parent and the student.

Mr. carbonu explained, “We expect that if you want to be in that school, you obey the rules and regulations. The rules and regulations of an institution are not chosen and picked by individuals, they become standard and ought to be obeyed by anyone who wants to access the school”.

“There are people who are born blind, there are people who are born deaf, there are people who are born handicapped, is that not so? Good. Are there not institutions for them? Are there not institutions for all these people?

“The Ga Wulomei will not wear shoes when he is in his white calico, true or not so?”

“If all these people come to a school and want to manifest their religions what are we going to do?” He questioned.

The debate over the admission of two students with dreadlocks to Achimota SHS reached another stage Monday when the school stood its ground in asking the students to cut their dreadlocks before they would be enrolled. At a meeting with the management of the Ghana Education Service (GES), the headmistress of the school, Mrs Majorie Affenyi, and the parents of one of the students in Accra on Monday, the headmistress maintained that the students had not been denied admission to the school.

Rather, the decision was for them to cut their dreadlocks in conformity with the school’s rules.

The father of the student, Ras Aswad Nkrabea, who sat in the meeting, told the Daily Graphic that the headmistress insisted that the school would not bend its rules with respect to admission.

“The GES and the headmistress of the Achimota School came together and said my son cuts his hair. That is the position both of them took,” Ras Nkrabea said. He said his next step would be to proceed to court but in the meantime he would find another school until the matter was settled.

 

 

 

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